The problem"They’re designed to be flushed with a liter and a half of water poured out of teapots," vice president of engineering Jim McHale said, "but they’re so poorly designed you can’t clear the waste through them."
The solutionIt took a trip to Bangladesh and testing 12 prototypes with computational fluid dynamics, but an American Standard team of engineers has debuted two redesigned latrine pans at the Reinventing the Toilet Fair in Seattle.
Read more of Stacy Jones's story on NJ.com

The problem
"They’re designed to be flushed with a liter and a half of water poured out of teapots," vice president of engineering Jim McHale said, "but they’re so poorly designed you can’t clear the waste through them."

The solution
It took a trip to Bangladesh and testing 12 prototypes with computational fluid dynamics, but an American Standard team of engineers has debuted two redesigned latrine pans at the Reinventing the Toilet Fair in Seattle.

Read more of Stacy Jones's story on NJ.com

A simple fact that is hard to learn is that the time to save money is when you have some.
Joe Moore (via moneyisnotimportant)

(via moneyisnotimportant)

She’s relatively young. She’s attractive. She has a pleasant smile, is approachable and she’s very helpful. But she’s no Siri. She’s never discussed the meaning of life with John Malkovich or rearranged Marty Scorsese’s day for him like that smart-as-anything knowledge navigator on the Apple iPhone 4S.

Meet Libby, a red-jacketed customer care representative at Newark Liberty International Airport. She’s just one of 70 new agents hired at the region’s three main airports.

But Libby, like Siri, isn’t real. Named after Newark Liberty, she is an avatar, a computerized image projected onto Plexiglas.

Read more of Tom DePoto's story on NJ.com.

Colgan Air has begun winding down operations at Newark Liberty International Airport, with its last flights schedule for Sept. 4, a company spokesman said yesterday.
The regional airline is a subsidiary of Pinnacle Airlines, which filed for bankurptcy protection April 1. Colgan, which operated flights for Continental and United Airlines at Newark, didn’t factor into the restructuring plan, said Eric Epperson, a Pinnacle spokesman.
Read more of Tom DePoto's story on NJ.com.

Colgan Air has begun winding down operations at Newark Liberty International Airport, with its last flights schedule for Sept. 4, a company spokesman said yesterday.

The regional airline is a subsidiary of Pinnacle Airlines, which filed for bankurptcy protection April 1. Colgan, which operated flights for Continental and United Airlines at Newark, didn’t factor into the restructuring plan, said Eric Epperson, a Pinnacle spokesman.

Read more of Tom DePoto's story on NJ.com.

Even though some key aggregate metrics — including consumer spending, disposable income, household net worth, and debt service payments — have moved in the direction of recovery, it is clear that many individuals and households continue to struggle with difficult economic and financial conditions.
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke in prerecorded remarks for a conference in Cambridge, Mass. | More on NJ.com.

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Oscar Pistorius runs with 5-year-old Ellie May Challis. Images taken from here, photographed by Andy Hooper. Find out more about Ellie May and her run with Oscar here.

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$15 billion dollars.
At $750 per book, that’s how much The Authors Guild wants to see Google pay for the more than 20 million books it has reproduced and distributed through its digital library. | More on NJ.com.
The ink on Donna Dequina’s divorce papers has been dry for more than 10 years, but keen hindsight still plagues her.
A settlement that seemed fine at the time has brought her back into court many times as she struggles to enforce the vaguely worded document.
“I had to go through hell, but someone should benefit from all the mistakes I made,” she said. “My focus is to get the right information out there so people can make the right decisions.”
Dequina wants to build a network of legal and financial planning experts who lead educational seminars that divorce lawyers in urban areas can offer to their clients. Many women in minority communities, she said, feel intense pressure not to end their marriage.
“What my lawyer and counselor didn’t understand is that if I filed for divorce, I would become the black sheep of my Filipino family. I could not go to church anymore,” she said. “We’re Catholic and divorce is not OK.”
After completing a 12-week entrepreneurship course with Rising Tide Capital, a Jersey City-based nonprofit, Dequina applied for and was offered a one-year residency at the Business Development Incubator at New Jersey City University.
Last year the incubator housed 25 burgeoning businesses that generated nearly $8 million in aggregate gross revenue and created 153 jobs. But Dequina might be one of the last people who works rent-free at BDI unless the nonprofit can replace a $400,000 U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development grant with alternative funding.
Read more of Stacy Jones's story on NJ.com.
Photo: Saed Hindash/The Star-Ledger

The ink on Donna Dequina’s divorce papers has been dry for more than 10 years, but keen hindsight still plagues her.

A settlement that seemed fine at the time has brought her back into court many times as she struggles to enforce the vaguely worded document.

“I had to go through hell, but someone should benefit from all the mistakes I made,” she said. “My focus is to get the right information out there so people can make the right decisions.”

Dequina wants to build a network of legal and financial planning experts who lead educational seminars that divorce lawyers in urban areas can offer to their clients. Many women in minority communities, she said, feel intense pressure not to end their marriage.

“What my lawyer and counselor didn’t understand is that if I filed for divorce, I would become the black sheep of my Filipino family. I could not go to church anymore,” she said. “We’re Catholic and divorce is not OK.”

After completing a 12-week entrepreneurship course with Rising Tide Capital, a Jersey City-based nonprofit, Dequina applied for and was offered a one-year residency at the Business Development Incubator at New Jersey City University.

Last year the incubator housed 25 burgeoning businesses that generated nearly $8 million in aggregate gross revenue and created 153 jobs. But Dequina might be one of the last people who works rent-free at BDI unless the nonprofit can replace a $400,000 U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development grant with alternative funding.

Read more of Stacy Jones's story on NJ.com.

Photo: Saed Hindash/The Star-Ledger


Jim Holt is off the hook for $19,295.
After collecting 19 months of unemployment benefits, the checks suddenly stopped coming.
When he asked why, the state said Holt’s former employer — Diocesan Housing Services, an entity of the Catholic Diocese of Camden — was a nonprofit religious organization and therefore exempt from paying into the unemployment system.
Therefore, the state said, Holt was ineligible for benefits and he would have to pay the money back. All of it.
But something wasn’t right. Holt paid into the unemployment system through his paychecks from March 2008 until September 2009. Somewhere in the middle of that time, Diocesan Housing Services switched its status to a nonprofit, but it continued to collect unemployment funds from Holt’s paychecks.
Holt was in the system, so it seemed he should be eligible for unemployment.

Read more of this week’s Bamboozled column on NJ.com.

Jim Holt is off the hook for $19,295.

After collecting 19 months of unemployment benefits, the checks suddenly stopped coming.

When he asked why, the state said Holt’s former employer — Diocesan Housing Services, an entity of the Catholic Diocese of Camden — was a nonprofit religious organization and therefore exempt from paying into the unemployment system.

Therefore, the state said, Holt was ineligible for benefits and he would have to pay the money back. All of it.

But something wasn’t right. Holt paid into the unemployment system through his paychecks from March 2008 until September 2009. Somewhere in the middle of that time, Diocesan Housing Services switched its status to a nonprofit, but it continued to collect unemployment funds from Holt’s paychecks.

Holt was in the system, so it seemed he should be eligible for unemployment.

Read more of this week’s Bamboozled column on NJ.com.

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Olympics vs Mars

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Olympics vs Mars

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From the newsroom of New Jersey's largest daily, The Star-Ledger. Read all of the business desk's coverage on NJ.com.

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